EU’s new Circular Economy Action Plan (published by EU Commission, March 2020)

Foreword from the report from the EU Commission, published March 2020:

“There is only one planet Earth, yet by 2050, the world will be consuming as if there were three1. Global consumption of materials such as biomass, fossil fuels, metals and minerals is expected to double in the next forty years2, while annual waste generation is projected to increase by 70% by 2050.

As half of total greenhouse gas emissions and more than 90% of biodiversity loss and water stress come from resource extraction and processing, the European Green Deal4 launched a concerted strategy for a climate-neutral, resource-efficient and competitive economy. Scaling up the circular economy from front-runners to the mainstream economic players will make a decisive contribution to achieving climate neutrality by 2050 and decoupling economic growth from resource use, while ensuring the long-term competitiveness of the EU and leaving no one behind.More

Starbucks Commits to a Resource-Positive Future, Giving More than It Takes from the Planet (article by Sustainable Brands, January 2020)

Extract from the SB article, January 2020:

“In a public letter to all company stakeholders, CEO Kevin Johnson sets 2030 science-based targets for carbon, water and waste as part of a multi-decade aspiration.

Hot on the heels of a similarly groundbreaking, industry-leading announcement last week from Microsoft, Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson outlined today, in a public letter, a multi-decade commitment to become a resource-positive company — aspiring to give more than it takes from the planet. The announcement included science-based preliminary targets for the reduction of carbon emissions, water use and waste by 2030; and outlined five strategies the company has identified to move toward them.

More

Today, the global economy is only 8.6% circular — just two years ago it was 9.1%! (report from Circle Economy, January 2020)

Executive summary from the report “THE CIRCULARITY GAP REPORT”:

“Today, the global economy is only 8.6% circular — just two years ago it was 9.1%. The global circularity gap is widening. There are reasons for this negative trend, but the result remains the same: the news is not just bad, it is worse. The negative trend overall can be explained by three related, underlying trends: high rates of extraction; ongoing stock build-up; plus, low levels of end-of-use processing and cycling. These trends are embedded deep within the ‘take-make-waste’ tradition of the linear economy — the problems are hardwired. As such, the outlook to close the circularity gap looks bleak under the dead hand of business as usual. We desperately need transformative and correctional solutions; change is a must.More

World Economic Forum: Here’s how a circular economy could change the world by 2030 (Article October 2019)

Article from World Economic Forum, 29 Oct 2019 by Leanne Kemp, Chief Executive Officer, Everledger:

“Let me share my vision of 2030

By then, we are living in a global circular economy that has become ‘intentionally transparent’. This open mindset has released a surge in trust throughout the world’s supply chains that encourages higher visibility and greater control over responsible sourcing. We now have ethical and sustainable circular supply chains in which the rewards are shared equitably, right from local communities through to the primary consumer and beyond.More

CEO Guide to the Circular Bioeconomy (report by WBCSD and BCG, November 2019)

WBCSD released the CEO Guide to the Circular Bioeconomy, a call for the shift towards a sustainable, low-carbon, circular bioeconomy.

It presents a USD $7.7 trillion opportunity for business by 2030, establishing the circular bioeconomy as a nature-based solution that addresses five of our greatest environmental priorities.

While the global population has doubled over the last 50 years, resource extraction has tripled.More

Buying less is better than buying green for the planet and your happiness! (Study from University of Arizona, October 2019)

A new study found that people who consume less are happier than those who engage in other pro-environmental consumer behaviors, like buying environmentally friendly products.

Humans’ overconsumption of resources — from the food and clothes we buy to the methods of transportation we choose — is a leading contributor to global climate change, says University of Arizona researcher Sabrina Helm. Therefore, it’s increasingly important to understand the choices consumers make and how those decisions affect the health of a planet with limited resources.More

Her er klimaeffekten af at handle second hand – produkt for produkt (Avfall Sverige, August 2019)

Ny rapport fra Avfall Sverige:

“Att återanvända kläder sparar tio gånger mer koldioxid än att återvinna materialet för att skapa nya textilier.

Varje mobil som återanvänds istället för att skrotas sparar cirka 60 kg koldioxidekvivalenter.

De högsta koldioxidbesparingarna genereras enligt Avfall Sverige genom förebyggande av textil samt av elektriskt och elektroniskt avfall.More

181 major US businesses commit to act fairly and sustainably (published August 2019)

A welcome development this week was the declaration from 181 chief executives of US companies to operate in a way that values and recognizes all their stakeholders.

The signatories to the Statement on the Purpose of a Corporation, organized by Business Roundtable, includes commitments to:

  • Respect communities and the environment by embracing sustainable business practices;
  • Deal with suppliers and partners fairly and ethically;
  • Invest in their employees, fostering diversity and inclusion;
  • Demonstrate transparency and effective stakeholder engagement.

More