The right way to support the sustainable development goals (April 2018)

Source: MIT Sloan Management Review, April 2018

Are Companies Succeeding at the SDGs or at “SDG Washing”?

When 193 member states launched the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at the United Nations in 2015, it was not clear how businesses could contribute to an agenda that covered such wide-ranging topics as eliminating poverty and hunger and promoting peaceful, just, and strong institutions worldwide.More

MIT Sloan Management Review: Supporting sustainable development goals is easier than you might think (February 2018)

It is possible for business to be both sustainable and profitable — but some sectors have a smoother path than others.

Companies and investors are being asked to support the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for 2030 — what some have described as “the closest thing the Earth has to a strategy”— since the public sector alone does not have the resources to do so. At the same time, companies must create value for their shareholders to create the returns they need for their ultimate beneficiaries.

In essence, both are being asked to do good and do well at the same time.More

RobecoSAM: The Sustainability Yearbook 2018 (January 2018)

SDGs are having a positive effect on corporate behavior.

Their increasing popularity is helping foster a culture of scrutiny, transparency, and accountability in business and government.

Knowing how firms deploy assets is important but it is also useful to know how they deploy influence to shape public policy through activities like advocacy campaigns, think-tank funding, and legislative consulting.More

Corporate carbon emissions reaching the lowest level in the past 5 years (2018 State of Green Business Index – January 2018)

The 2018 State of Green Business Index — Trucost’s annual assessment of corporate environmental performance among the world’s 1,200 largest companies and 500 largest firms in the United States — reveals a worrisome finding.

The natural capital costs of companies had previously been falling, but the latest year’s results show a sharp increase. As a result, the natural capital cost generated by the largest global companies is nearly two times higher than their net income.More